Outside In at Brighton Art Fair

This weekend, Outside In will be taking part in the Brighton Art Fair (at the Brighton Dome). The Fair opens tonight (Thursday 25 September) and continues until Sunday 28 September.

For over ten years, the Brighton Art Fair has been bringing 100 of the brightest and best contemporary visual artists from Sussex and around the country together. It is the largest annual art exhibition on the South Coast and enables artists across all media to sell their work to the public, building a relationship with buyers. potential buyers, galleries and curators.

Outside In has ten artists taking part in the Fair – so please find a brief bit of information about each one below. If you are on the South Coast this weekend, please pop into the Dome and say hello to our artists and staff who will be manning the stall. We hope to see you there!

Featured image: Terence Wilde


Anthony Stevens

Anthony started producing his trademark stitch-work after trying his hand at stitching his own t-shirts. During this short period, he began to take more notice of the process he was using; sifting, sorting and separating what was useful, but not throwing anything away. Anthony’s work is imbued with meaning; right from the fabric he chooses to the pattern he overlays it with. But it is his use of a Nicherin Buddhism inspired ritualistic process that makes his practice so interesting. This form of Buddhism has a strong focus on chanting and recital, which Anthony uses to bring into focus an image, phrase or idea which he will then quickly scribble down.

Anthony Stevens, Culture Vulture

Anthony Stevens, Culture Vulture


Aradne

Aradne completed a three year Fashion Textile course in 1979 and has continued to explore different ways of expressing herself in textiles and art. The cultural and social issues of South Africa, where Aradne was born and spent the early part of her childhood, have left their mark and still impact upon her work. Working intuitively, Aradne looks at her work as a language or tool to communicate how she sees the world in her mind and not through her eyes. The artist stitches automatically straight onto the fabric using hand and machine embroidery techniques on fine muslin, predominantly in black and white. The works constantly develop during the process of creating, until Aradne feels satisfied that each individual piece conveys the message she wants to communicate.

Aradne

Aradne


David Bradley

David first started making art twelve years ago, during a period in his life that was defined by despair and angst in the hope that it would provide an outlet for his feelings. He started out with landscapes before moving onto his trademark portraits – these were much truer to how he was feeling at the time. Wanting to raise awareness of the effects that life can have on people, surroundings and the environment, David feels peace when he is creating. He also experiences a sense of accomplishment on completing a piece; as though he has release something from deep within himself.

David Bradley, Untitled

David Bradley, Untitled


Jack Haslam

Jack’s work is about friendship, loyalty and control. His love for animals has been a major influence in his life and is one of the main driving forces behind his work and what others might consider minor and unimportant details and the very things that inspire Jack’s work. Fascinated by the minutiae of different animals: the gorilla’s cheeks and the anteater’s claws, Jack’s resulting portraits of animals appear fanciful, majestic and, at times, desperate.

Jack Haslam, Bear

Jack Haslam, Bear


Jasna Nikolic

Jasna Nikolic has been interested in art since her childhood. She began doing graphic design at school before studying Applied Art in her native Belgrade and specialising in Fresco Painting for her MA. In her contemporary practice, Jasna is very much influenced by iconography, but mediaeval art is her deepest inspiration and usually visually traceable in her work. Only analysing and evaluating her work when it is complete, Jasna simply ‘acts’ during the art making process, in an attempt to avoid her rational side becoming an obstacle. A certain type of playfulness is apparent in her work, as she attempts to stay in a child-like state of spirit. This might be the reason, Jasna says, that she enjoys watercolour, mono-print, collage, along with other Surrealist methods.

IMG_1292

Jasna Nikolic


Kate Bradbury

Years ago in London, Kate Bradbury started making pictures and assemblages from the materials and debris left behind by previous, unknown tenants. Since then more of her time and space has been consumed with the practise of using pen and ink on thin Chinese paper and constructing assemblages from found, organic materials. She is drawn to the idea of turning familiar and often damaged objects into unrecognisable constructions. “To be able to animate them would be a dream.”

Kate Bradbury

Kate Bradbury


Linda Bell

Linda’s work is predominantly interactive. Mainly working in sculpture and installation, she explores a wide range of materials and processes all with a strong tactile quality. The process of making is crucial to Linda’s own relationship with her work, where she explores the nature of and the sensitive connection between the utilised materials. She frequently makes work that can be played with and whilst making, she will experiment with ways of moving and engaging with a piece.

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Linda Bell


Mitsi Brown

Mitsi Brown has a BA Hons in textiles and Surface Design and has been making art since she was able to hold a pencil. She has never stopped painting. Inspired by Picasso and Basquiat and an introvert, the artist uses her work as a way of expressing her feelings. Following the Brighton Open Houses, Mitsi Brown will be taking part in the Worthing Art Trail. Painting the things around her, Mitsi Brown’s subjects can verge on the disturbing, dark or humorous side. Evoking the enormous emotional force and beauty found within the human mind, each one of the artist’s paintings evolves freely and independently, driven by emotion.

Mitsi Brown

Mitsi Brown


Stacey Fish

Stacey started working with Artists First in 2011. She enjoyed art at school, where she would work on an art project all day. She first began attending Artists First as she was unable to do her work anywhere else. Stacey takes inspiration from everyday life and the things that are going on around her; for example the musical instruments in the Artists First building – the Centre for Music and the Arts. Stacey enjoys the end results of her work, and is very keen for other people to see her art.Inspired by seeing this that she can draw and by looking at books, Stacey tends to use bright colours in her paintings. When she gets started, she works fast; concentrating on what she is doing.

Stacey Fish, Horse outside the windows

Stacey Fish, Horse outside the windows


Terence Wilde

Since watching ‘A Taste of Honey’ at a young age, Terence has been inspired by the character who drew ballerinas on the walls of a run-down flat to make life seem better. He approaches drawing in much the same way as he approaches meditiation; phone off, music selected, and some reflection. This, he says, “helps create a receptive space for my often messy and chaotic mind.”

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For more information on Outside In at the Brighton Art Fair, click here.

 

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2 thoughts on “Outside In at Brighton Art Fair

  1. A stunning collection of works – I wish I could have been in Brighton but hope to catch up with some of the artists on the website. I was particularly struck by David Bradley and Mitsi Brown.

    I’m full of admiration for you all

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